Mike Fleming

Author Archives

  • How I Rephrased 2 Words in a Headline & Improved Results by 34%!

    I love new ways to think about how to create ad copy.  Looking back on my younger PPC management years, I definitely didn’t give enough weight to it from the beginning.  That’s probably because I’ve always been a numbers guy first.  But then I had a eureka moment when I said to myself…“You’re in advertising stupid!”  You should learn how to be a better ad writer.

    So when I came across this excellent post by Roger Dooley about writing taglines that double sales, I was excited to add it to my repertoire of techniques for testing.

    The 2 consumer motivations

    In the post, he references a Harvard Business Review article pointing out that consumers are motivated by basically two things – preventing their life from getting worse (prevention) and taking advantage of an opportunity to make their life better (promotion).  If you’re in advertising, I’m sure you already know this.  But what you may not have done yet is considered how this should affect the messages you’re putting out to the world, and how you can test saying the same thing in these 2 different ways.

    Inherently, people and products may be more attuned to prevention or promotion.  And the better you can match your messages up to the motivations of the majority of your customers, the more effective your advertising is going to be.

    I encourage you to jump over to his post if you haven’t already and check out his examples of framing products with prevention/promotion language and the results of the tests he references.

  • buyer psychology

    AdWords’ Price Extensions: 5 Powerful Techniques You Can Use

    In the past when we’ve talked about pricing strategies in digital marketing, it’s mostly been a conversation about post-click conversion rate optimization.  Sure, we’ve always been able to put prices in ad text.  But with the release of 2 newer ad extensions in Google AdWords (and the presence of product listing ads), it’s becoming more and more of a pre-click conversation as time goes on.

    Part of what makes us human

    When you get to Marketing 201, you learn that buyers make emotional decisions when it comes to purchasing, and then use rationale to justify their behavior after their emotions have influenced them one way or the other.

    buyer psychologyThis emotional piece is of course part of what makes us humans and not robots.

    In a recent book I read called Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioral Economics, the famed economist Richard Thaler talks about the differences in behaviors that behavioral economists are learning because of human emotion.  He calls what a human would be without any emotion an “econ.” (instead of a robot).  An econ is a being that would make decisions simply based on choosing the best logical choice given all the available information.

    Throughout the book, he goes through study after study of scenarios and points out the differences between what a econ would do versus what humans tend to do because they’re emotional creatures.